HOW CAN WE USE VISUAL LANGUAGE TO RAISE AWARENESS OF INVISIBLE DISABILITIES?

Invisible disability hate crime is on the increase and many disabled people fear leaving their homes or even using the priority parking spaces and disabled access toilets they are legally entitled to.

Invisibly disabled public transport passengers are being accosted for using priority seating and made to feel ashamed for not giving them up when they have every right to use them.

The main aim of this project is to use visual communication to raise awareness of invisible disabilities, and the legitimate right of the invisibly disabled to access priority accommodations under the current symbol, without having to constantly verify they are “disabled enough”. 

My Invisible Friend

BROKEN AND 50 YEARS OUT OF DATE


Questions in parliament and a two-year campaign to redesign the ISA has failed to find a workable solution, so this defective mark will be with us for another fifty years.

BROKEN AND 50 YEARS OUT OF DATE Image

THE EQUALITY ACT 2010


People with invisible disabilities are often subject to negative “ableist assumptions” when utilising disabled services such as parking spaces and priority seats on public transport. 

Invisible Disability Project

THE EQUALITY ACT 2010 Image

ONLY 1% REQUIRE A WHEELCHAIR


A prominent ableist assumption is that you are not ‘really’ disabled unless the disability is visible, especially through an assistive device. Only 1% of the WORLD population uses a wheelchair.

ONLY 1% REQUIRE A WHEELCHAIR Image

ONE IN FIVE PEOPLE ARE DISABLED


There are

14 Million disabled people in the UK

22% of the population

1 in 5 People in the UK are disabled

However, 80% of disabilities are invisible

ONE IN FIVE PEOPLE ARE DISABLED Image

DISABLED COVID 19 RIGHTS


Those who have an age, health or disability reason for not wearing a face covering should not be routinely asked to give any written evidence of this, including exemption cards. 

Disability Hate Crime Reporting

DISABLED COVID 19 RIGHTS Image

JUDGMENTAL COMMENTS


Even with the toilet signs designed by The Crohn’s & Colitis Organisation my daughter who has ulcerative colitis is often subjected to judgmental stares, rude comments and upsetting challenges.

Not all Disabilities are Visible

JUDGMENTAL COMMENTS Image

NASTY NOTES


‘Microaggression’, “A comment or action that expresses a prejudiced attitude toward a member of a marginalized group.” Invisibly disabled are often subjected to microaggressions in the form of ‘Nasty Notes’ 

NASTY NOTES IMAGE

NASTY NOTES Image

DESPERATE FOR A PEE


Access to a disabled toilet is not a privilege it is a necessity!

London Tube Toilets

DESPERATE FOR A PEE Image

PRIORITY ACCESS HIERARCHY


When it comes to disabled priority space on public transport, invisibly disabled people are at the back of the queue, because they have no visible proof of requirement.

PRIORITY ACCESS HIERARCHY Image

WORDS THAT WOUND


In 2019 the government extended the Blue Badge parking scheme to include many invisible disabilities that previously were not recognized.

WORDS THAT WOUND Image

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Heather List

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  • Degree show 2020
    • Master of Graphic Design